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Photo Wall Display on DIY Restoration Hardware Shelves

Saturday, November 9, 2013

When we were preparing for baby boy's arrival we were so fortunate to meet several fabulous couples expecting their first child at the same time in our child birth class.  We have stayed in touch and although we haven't had a chance to see each other a lot recently, it is still so fun to see the little ones grow.  Anyway, not long ago we went to a 2nd birthday party for one of the little boy's from our fall baby group.  Their house was absolutely beautiful.  I loved everything about it and could certainly use a decorating lesson from them.  In their living they had these powerful shelves from Restoration Hardware that I fell in love with, the only problem was the reclaimed wood was far too light to match the other wood in our front room.  The shelves were the perfect place to display family photos.

DIY Restoration Hardware Shelves

Using their shelves as our inspiration we set out to recreate them, but be able to stain them so they could more closely match our other furniture.

The handy husband went out and bought 2x10 that was 16 feet long and had it cut into three 4 1/2 foot  lengths with a little extra leftover.  He also bought six 3/4" x 10" galvanized pipe, 3/4" floor flange and 3/4" end caps to be the wall bracket for the shelf.

We used old screws, a hammer, a screw driver and a razor blade to distress the wood.  Next we sanded the boards down and stained them with a Classic Gray Minwax stain.



We also spray painted the bracket pieces an antiqued bronze so it would match the finishes of the other furniture instead of being a steel color.


After all of the prep work, we hung the shelves with one side screwed into a stud and used self-drilling drywall anchors on the other side.  We spaced the shelves 21" apart in height in order for the frames and decorations to have a little breathing room.

How to Make Restoration Hardware Shelves DIY


I love how the shelves turned out.  They really help to own the wall space and now I just can't wait to get some photographs printed for the frames.      

15 comments :

  1. Hello - visiting from Knock Off Decor! I love, love, love these shelves!! I consider my home decor style as "rustic industrial" and this fits perfectly. Thanks for sharing - pinning. :)

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    1. Chrissy, they were super easy to create, and really own the space on the wall they take up. Glad you enjoyed the post.

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  2. Do you remember how much these shelves cost to make? Thanks!

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    1. Hi Colleen,

      The brackets were about $25 per pair for all the different parts. The board was $20 based on the size we got. Then we purchased the stain, the spray paint for the brackets and some screws and wall anchors. I believe we ended up spending about $125 after tax on all of the parts.

      Thanks!

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  3. Also... do the shelves sit "inside" the end caps, so that they don't slide off the pipes?

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    1. Yes, the shelves sit inside the end caps, and also inside the floor flange, so it is like they are settled in. In looking at other shelving tutorials, I know some people do drill a hole in their various brackets so that they can insert a screw into the shelf, however we felt comfortable with just the shelf resting on the bracket.

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  4. I am about to make these shelves for my bedroom. Thanks for the wonderful idea! I am using some old barn wood which is 6 inches wide. I found 7 inch pipe and all the fittings I need at a local plumbing supply shop at a much lower price than the big box stores. I spent about 8 dollars for the hardware for each shelf. If you buy black, it is cheaper than the shiny galvanized steel. Since I am painting it I went w the cheaper option.

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    1. Oh that's great to hear! I love barn wood, and what a steal on your piping. I didn't even really think to shop around (got to wrapped up and excited to get started on the project), I'm sure there are even some outlets online where the fittings would be a lower cost too. Good luck with your shelves.

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  6. These look amazing! Any ideas on how much weight these can hold?

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    1. Hi Cindy, I probably wouldn't put more than 75 pounds on each shelf. We have one side screwed into the stud and one side placed with dry wall anchors. The anchor package says they should hold up to 100 pounds, but I'm a little unsure if I would want to put that much weight on them.

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  7. Hi Leslie! I love your blog! I'm getting ready to make ur fabulous shelves and have a ?! When you cut your pipe…did you do it with something that leaves threads(?) so the wall flanges/end caps have something for them to screw onto? Thanks so much!

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    1. Hi Phil. Thanks so much. We actually didn't cut the pipes, but bought the pipes already to that length so it had threads on both ends. I would assume you could cut the pipe to length but would keep the threaded end for the flange and then could simply glue the end cap on to the cut end if needed. Hope the project goes well for you!

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  8. I also love your DIY fix to the expensive Restoration Hardware. I went to my local Ace Hardware, purchased glass shelving and the staff helped me to find the necessary hardware. The end caps and flanges both have stamped writing (3/4") on the metal and especially the end cap stamp will be very noticeable. Not sure that I like that much industrial look. Did your end caps have the imprinted numbers? Can you think of a work around?

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